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Segregation Watch

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Government enforced racial segregation is alive and well in Birmingham.

No, not Birmingham, Alabama. Birmingham, England.

Young black and Asian men in Birmingham hack chunks out of each other in a self-described “race war”, while the government’s education White Paper quietly prepares the ground for a massive expansion of faith schools. At first, these seem like disparate, disconnected news stories – headlines passing each other in the night.

But in reality, the fact that Britain has 7,000 expanding faith schools – Muslims to the left, Christians to the right – is feeding the Balkanisation of Britain’s towns and preparing the ground for one, two, three Birminghams.

After every Brum-style race riot in Britain over the past decade, there has been a government inquiry – and every time, the sober professors in charge issue the same warning. Segregating children according to their parents’ superstitions is a great way to create a volatile, violent town where ethnic groups glare at each other across a chasm of mutual incomprehension. As Bradford cleaned up after its own smash-and-crash race riots in 2001, the council woke up to the fact that its city had hardened into racial ghettos. It boldly decided to create shared social spaces, starting with infants because a four-year-old is more open to making their first white, black or Asian friend than a 40-year-old. But there was a problem. David Ward, the Bradford council member responsible for education, explained that the Government’s obsessive humming – “You gotta have faith/ faith/ faith” – made it impossible to build mixed schools. “You feel as if you are fighting with two hands tied behind your back,” he said. “We are trying to desegregate in Bradford but we are powerless when we have schools dictating their own admissions policies.”

Rosa, you left us too soon. The world still has need of you. Would you ever have thought that Theophilus Eugene ” Bull” Connor’s old whites only paradise one day would be more progressive than its British namesake.