Technology with attitude

Brain-Controlled Exoskeleton Legs Hold Promise for Paraplegics (VIDEO)

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brain-controlled ambulation in robotic leg test

Spinal cord injury victims may be able to look forward to life beyond a wheelchair via a robotic leg prosthesis controlled by brain waves. Individuals with paraplegia due to spinal cord injury who are wheelchair-bound face serious health problems, or in medical terminology, comorbidities, such as metabolic derangement, heart disease, osteoporosis, and pressure ulcers. New research efforts are being directed toward restoring brain-controlled ambulation for those who suffer from spinal cord injuries.

What can you see on the above image?

  • Left: The experimental setup showing the subject suspended in the RoGO, while donning an EEG cap, surface EMG electrodes, and a gyroscope on the left leg. A monitor (not shown), placed in front of the subject at eye-level, presented instructional cues.
  • Top Right: The CPCA-AIDA feature extraction maps at the 8-10 Hz bin. Since feature extraction is piecewise linear, there is one map for each of the 2 classes. Brain areas with values close to +1 or -1 are most salient for distinguishing between idling and walking classes at this frequency.
  • Bottom Right: Histogram of averaged posterior probabilities. Credit: arXiv:1208.5024v1 [cs.HC

Watch a video of the RoGO exoskeleton leg prosthesis in motion below, or read more about the story on phys.org.