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Trivium Frontman Bemoans Lack Of Brotherhood In Metal

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Trivium
I get what he’s saying. I mean, brotherhood’s sort of non-existent these days. Especially in the blogging world. But that’s a story for another time.

Trivium’s Matt Heafy tells U.K.’s Metal Hammer magazine that the state of metal is good, and “in a great place and it’s also in a bad place.”

Bummer alert.

“I think the fact that there is so much… I guess to each his own, and I always talk about being acceptant of all styles of life and all genres of music — I mean, you can learn something from everything — there is a lot of manufactured nonsense out there.”

Oh Matt. Could it just be no one actually digs you or your band?

“For me, when I think of hardcore and I think of metal and I think of bands that I love from those genres… I don’t know. In my head, I know what they should sound like. And I can see what these bands are all copycatting off each other’s copycatting and not quite making anything original and not making anything of their own; they just keep copying a form of a copy.”

Wait, is he talking about his own band?

“I know I’ve been looking for that young, new metal band.

“Where are the kids that are picking up a guitar, saying, ‘Hey, I wanna be like Iron Maiden,’ ‘Hey, I wanna be like Metallica?’ Instead it’s bands that are putting weird dance music in with heavy music. Which is fine — I guess they’re doing something that kids love — but for me, as a metal fan, I’m missing out on where are the young kids picking up a guitar and starting metal bands.

“I guess there are a few last hopes out there — there are some really incredible bands that are doing some really incredible things. The fact that Metallica and Iron Maiden are bigger than ever is a really, really great thing.

“We, as fans of metal, need to not just look at it as a thing to get turned on to casually — it’s a lifestyle; it’s far beyond just something that we casually listen to.

“I think that metal fans and metal bands need to support each other and band together and help bring each other further and bring each other upwards versus trying to drag each other down. I’m not saying that’s a common feature and that’s what’s happening now, but I definitely don’t see enough of a brotherhood, of people helping each other — bands helping each other go up, fans supporting all bands because they’re in the genre they love. I think we need more of that. And we need more kids to start playing metal again.”

We need you to stop.