Technology with attitude

Apple’s iPhone Camera is Made of 200 Pieces, by 800 Engineers

0

The Apple iPhone is one of the most revolutionary devices that this company has ever created.

Ever since it was introduced, this smartphone has seen several advancements come on board, with the latest being the introduction of 3D Touch – a pressure-sensitive technology on the screens of iPhone 6S and 6S Plus.

Another major change that came in with the iPhone 6 was the introduction of a much better camera as compared to the previous models. Today, the iPhone 6S Plus comes with a powerful rear snapper of 12MP and a frontal camera of 5MP.

While the camera is definitely one of the tiniest parts of the smartphone, there is a shocking revelation about the development of this component. According to Apple, there are more than 800 engineers who work on perfecting the iPhone’s camera. You must be thinking: are they too many for just one phone?

Well, you will change your mind when you again hear that this most-used part of the iPhone is in fact made of 200 pieces. This information was revealed by the person who is overseeing the whole process during an interview with 60 Minutes, Graham Townsend.

According to Townsend, it takes more than you think when capturing a single image. “To capture a single image, there are over 24 billion operations that go on”, he said.

The more than 800 engineers who work on the camera have made family photos much better, thanks to the fact that they have come up with a way to counteract the shaky hands of people when capturing these photos. The camera is composed of four small wires with each of them measuring half the size of a human hair in terms of width.

These four wires then create a microsuspension of the snapper parts that can then absorb the shaking from the users’ hands when capturing a photo and the result will be a steady shot.

Townsend further revealed that his team of engineers has an official lab that is specifically meant for testing how the camera takes shots when in different lighting conditions. The engineers then use their findings to calibrate the snapper to capture the best shots, be it in bright sunlight or dim lighting when the sun is setting.

Now you at least have a clue as to why the iPhone 6S takes some of the best photos out there, even when compared to other smartphones that come with snappers with higher resolution lens, for instance, 13MP or 16MP.